Selling Is Easier In Person

I was sent an interesting article from my favorite periodical, Harvard Business Review. The article, entitled, “A face to face request is 34 times more successful than an email” talked about research into email vs in-person responses from customers.

According to the article,

Despite the reach of email, asking in person is the significantly more effective approach; you need to ask six people in person to equal the power of a 200-recipient email blast. Still, most people tend to think the email ask will be more effective.”

It seems that part of the difficulty is in the way those who are sending out these emails or texts view them. Let’s say you are sending out an email to people on your email list, you know that you are trustworthy, have quality products and are trying to sell them something that they will enjoy. However, do all the people you are sending this email to understand the same things of you? Do they automatically think that they can trust your company, what you are trying to sell and the value of the offering?

In order to create more effective email and text campaigns to customers, you must create and continue to nurture the in-person relationship with your customers.

When customers visit your place of business make sure that you interact with them on a personal level. Discover their wants and needs and what is important in their lives. That way you can personalize your on-line correspondence with these customers. Be sure to ask for the sale, while they are visiting. Let customers know that you believe in the products, which may make them more willing to buy again when you send them an email.

Part of your customers’ records should include how often they visit our store, whether they come to events and which ones they attend. Also keep track of how many you times you speak to them on the phone, whether they call you or you called them and the topic of the call. This enables you to know your customers’ buying habits.

Customers are the lifeblood of your business and should always be considered your most important asset.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Emotion Sells

As salespeople, we tend to think that we are going to sell more through our expertise or having lots of information about the product (obviously product knowledge is important though it cannot stand alone) and by providing top-notch customer service. All these things are important. However, the real key is to appeal to the customers’ emotions.

While scientists used to believe the decision to make a purchase was made from the rational mind, it turns out that emotions are in charge throughout the decision-making process. Throughout our lives we make decisions emotionally. Only after the emotional decision has been made does the customer then justify that decision with rational reasoning.  This is when the good sales person re-affirms the rational reasons why the product or service is a good buy.

According to marketing professor, Raj Raghunathan, even people who believe that emotional decisions are not the main reason they buy, those who consider themselves to be very rational are more prone to fall into this trap.

When you work with customers in any capacity you will sell more when you engage emotions and when you start the interaction with the idea that these people are going to buy from you. The earlier you make the emotional connection the better off you are. Once your customers have made the decision that they like what you have to offer they are less likely to back out of the transaction, according to the researchers.

Be cheerful, complimentary and engage the customers’ emotions. While the facts about the product or service are important, first you have to engage the emotions if you really want to make the sale, as the rational part of the brain will only be used to justify their emotional choices.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Using Testimonials to Encourage Sales

There are lots of ways to encourage customers to buy. When considering various avenues to promote sales, there are a few things you need to think about.

  1. There is always a cost involved with any option to promotion your business. Promotion costs either money or time. If it’s not costing you money, it is costing you time.
  2. Regardless of the methods of promotion you choose to use, it is important to track the results to make sure you are getting the response you want and hope for. For example, if you send out emails regularly to encourage sales, you need to track the percentage of people who open the emails, click through to the offer and how many take the final step and buy.

Shown below is an example of one low-cost way to promote your products.

Testimonials

Research has shown that reviews from other customers are as important to those who are thinking of buying from you as are reviews from “an expert” or someone famous. Using testimonials from past or current customers can and will encourage new customers to purchase.

Ask your customers to review your products or service or provide a testimonial with the reasons why they buy from you.

Once you have got these testimonials use them in different ways:

  • Ask customers to phone and record their testimonial or review. Use these recorded testimonials on your business phone for callers to hear while they are on hold. These reviews will be a lot more effective than music.
  • Put customer testimonials on your website. Have a tab for Reviews or Testimonials.
  • Ask customers to leave reviews on TripAdvisor, Yelp and other popular review sites.
  • Have a book of customer testimonials in the winery or store that people can browse through while they are waiting.
  • Put customer reviews at the bottom of your outgoing emails in the area of your contact information.
  • If you are doing these things, ask customers if they have seen the reviews or testimonials and if the service, products, etc. have lived up to reviews they read

Remember, peer reviews are important to other customers.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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What Makes People Buy?

I was looking into buying patterns on the internet, the other day, for a couple of sales seminars that I am putting together and came across some very interesting information, which I will be passing along via my blog and tips.

Consumers buy for a myriad of different reasons; here are some of them and think of what categories your products would be most likely to fall into. According to a number of sites I looked at, including Click Z, people buy for a whole host of reasons:

  1. To fill basic needs such as food and shelter. Though the idea of basic does vary a bit from person to person. Because I love to read, I find books to be a basic need for me.
  2. Something needs to be replaced or we want to replace that is getting old.
  3. Finding something at a bargain price or something that we consider a great value will light up our desire to purchase.
  4. A new or innovative product may also catch our attention. The newest iPhone is released and all the early adopters and lined up outside the Apple store waiting to buy it.
  5. Sometimes we feel we deserve a treat or a reward for something we have accomplished (even if it is just making it through a hard week). It doesn’t have to be anything big even a small reward can perk us up.
  6. Here’s one I really like, “The Girl Scout Cookie Effect.” We know that the reason we buy Girl Scout cookies (especially Thin Mints and my favorite Samoas) is because we are so unselfish. After all, we want to support a good cause.

There are lots of reasons why people buy and we will be delving into many of them over the next few blogs. We will also be looking at why people don’t buy and what we can do to help them get over that.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Get In The May Mood

There is a lot going on in the month of May.

Mother’s Day is coming up fast.

Think of different ways to wish a happy Mother’s Day to mothers and others. For example, if you are a winery that produces and sells Cabernet Sauvignon, wish happy Mother’s Day to Sauvignon Blanc, the wine that is the mother of Cabernet Sauvignon. Do the same on Father’s Day with Cabernet Franc.

Many people have May birthdays.

Invite your customers to join you for their birthday, with any customer who comes in during the week of his/her birthday gets a birthday surprise. I will leave it up to you to decide on the surprise, though it could be a flower, chocolate, preferential pricing, a coupon for their next visit, or access to a special offering or person – just to name a few.

There is something special going on every day in May. Here are a few “special” days during the month of May: Today (May 3rd) is Paranormal Day, Garden Meditation Day, School Nurse Day, Lumpy Rug Day (really!), for example.

Looking at a calendar for May shows me that every day in May has at least three special designations and some days have up to seven “special” designations. Some of them are important, such as May 28th which is Amnesty International Day and some less so, May 27th Cellophane (Scotch) Tape Day.

By the way, May 25th is National Wine Day, so you have plenty of time to get ready for that.

A tip of the glass from me to you, and have a great day no matter what you choose to celebrate!

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What About The Wine Label?

I was speaking to a group of wineries and growers recently about sales and marketing of wine and grapes. In the course of the conversation, a question was asked about the importance of the wine label. The question was about the look of the label and whether it was okay for a label to be quite plain and simple.

My answer was that yes, having a simple label is fine as long as it well executed, easy to read and it gave the government and buyers the information they needed.

The person who asked the question then responded by saying that he thought that the label was just the label and that “it’s what’s inside the bottle that counts.” While I don’t disagree that what is inside the bottle is very important, I hastened to add that the label was also of great importance.

For many people, the label is the first impression of your wine. Someone who has never tasted the wine has an impression of the label design and execution as well as the verbiage that will help him/her make the decision as to whether or not they buy that wine. This is especially true if you are selling your wines off-premise, where many buyers will not have the opportunity to talk to you.

Even if you sell all your wines through the winery, many of your customers will be influenced not only by the taste of the wine but also by the overall presentation of the wine, the label, the bottle the capsule, etc.

So while your label does not have to be fancy or expensively produced, it should be of the same expected quality to assure the customers that the price you are charging for the wine is warranted.

Keep a label simple if you wish but let it echo the quality that you know is in the bottle.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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First Emails to Customers

I was at the US Bev X conference and trade show in Washington DC in February.  It was a great conference with lots of pertinent information on a host of topics pertinent to all facets of the beverage industry.

In one of my sessions this question was asked:

“When a visitor comes to your winery and gives you their email address so you may send them information, how do you create that first email to engage with them further?”

This was an excellent question as that first email is crucial in strengthening the connection between your business and the new customer. My answer was that you have to go back to the initial encounter. This person came first to your tasting room and that is where the connection has to start. The staff members who interact with the visitors have to create the relationship from the beginning of the visit.

It is up to them to take the first steps in learning about these visitors:

Their names

Where they are from

What brought them to you

Their wants and needs, likes and dislikes

How much interest they have in the product.

These questions sprinkled throughout the conversation (rather than being asked one after the other) will be the beginning of the visitors’ relationship with the company and with the individual staff members. The staff members should also offer information, not only on the product but a trade of information about themselves, starting with their names. As the visit progresses staff members can mention the things that they may have in common with the visitors as well as giving them information that the visitors will be interested in.

These are the things that will make visitors give you their email and may turn these (possibly one-time visitors) into long-term customers, even if they live far away.

So back to that first email? It should be sent within a day or two after the visitors’ first visit. The email should be signed by the person or people the visitors connected with during their visit. It will renew the personal contact and should have some of the information they learned from the visitors. Remind them of what they enjoyed about the visit. Let them know how much their visit meant to you and that you look forward to seeing or hearing from them again.  There is plenty of time to sell to them in subsequent emails. Use the first one to engage emotions.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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