Thanksgiving – A Plethora of Emails

I received what seemed like a boatload of emails from wineries over the Thanksgiving and shopping extravaganza long weekend. Some wineries sent me up to five emails in a three or four-day period. Most were touting special pricing on their wines and/or low priced or free shipping.

Offers included:

  •  20% saving with $10 ground shipping
  • Free shipping plus the standard 10% case discount when $150.00 was spent
  • $10 flat rate shipping for gift sets (up to 12 bottles)
  • 5% off on all wines
  • 20% off all wines plus free shipping on 6+ bottles (Black Friday & Cyber Monday)
  • Save $10 on $40 (spent) online
  •  15% off, shipping included on 3+ bottles
  •  1¢shipping on $50 or more plus $10 off on $99 or more.

I also received Cyber Monday prices and Cyber Monday extensions, with the special pricing running through Tuesday.

One California winery did something different: on Black Friday they donated all tasting fees and $5 from each online purchase going to support victims of the Camp Fire (Paradise).

I understand that the Thanksgiving weekend (all the way through Cyber Monday and sometimes Tuesday) is about shopping. More money is spent during these four days (Friday through Monday)than at any other time of the year. So perhaps creating special pricing and/or free shipping options pays dividends. Though if you want your wine to be taken seriously discounting regularly is not the way to promote the quality or overall value. Value is not based solely on price. It is also based on the quality of the product, your reputation in the industry and what bragging rights go along with the purchase.

While it is not surprising that some people buy because of the price. It is not only the price that keeps them buying from you. You still have to have a quality product that fits their lifestyle.

Focus your emails on your customers and what is important to them, rather than what is important to you. 

Next week we will talk more about selling through emails and what information is needed to make it successful.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Working Through Guests’ Price Objections

When a guest objects to the price of one of your products, don’t be discouraged. Many times an objection to the price is the first signal that they really want to buy the product you are selling. If the guests were not interested, they would thank you and leave.

For some people, part of the fun of buying is seeing how much they can get off the retail price. They have every intention of buying while they enjoy the back and forth on price.

For the seller, rule one is: Just because guest quibbles over the price, don’t assume that they will not buy if you don’t give them the price they want.

If guests present objections (and price is the most likely) what they are looking for is you, as the seller, to tell them why they should buy it. They want the reasons why it was a good buy, so when their friends ask them why they bought the product they have a list of reasons why they made a wise buy.

This is particularly prevalent when selling wine. Let’s take Cabernet Sauvignon for example. There are so many different price points that for people who don’t know a lot about wine it is hard to discern why a $100.00 bottle of Cabernet is so much better than a $20.00 bottle of Cabernet.

Here are some of the things that may be prompting guests to object to the price:

What’s in it for me?”

It may be that the guests have not internalized the benefits to them when they buy this wine. Our job as a salesperson is to go over the benefits again, rather than the features. It is the benefit to the guests and their lives that will encourage them to buy the wine.

The emotional process of buying has not been addressed

Buying decisions are made in the emotional part of the brain. We prefer to think we are making intellectual decisions, but mostly they are emotional. So speak to the guests about how they feel about wine rather than how they think about it.

Let them know the wine is worth it

What are the reasons your wine is the price it is?

  • Grapes from a well-known vineyard
  • Amazing winemaker
  • Small production
  • Customer and reviewer accolades
  • Fills your whole palate with flavor
  • Not easy to make wine of this quality

Selling on price alone is never a good idea. Discover from your guests what makes them want to buy and sell those benefits and features that fit with their wants and needs.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

This is a busy week, both personally and in business, so I will make today’s blog brief.

As Black Friday is the biggest sales day for most businesses in the U.S. (and even in countries where they don’t celebrate Thanksgiving), keep in mind that it pays to spend a minute or two focusing on the guests and what they want, no matter how busy you are.

Here are a few tips:

Between each interaction with different groups of guests:

  • Take a deep breath
  • Reboot your attitude to positive
  • Approach every interaction as if it were the first of the day.

Lastly, bring at least two pairs of shoes to work with you on Black Friday. It really helps if you change shoes regularly as it changes the pressure points.

Here is a quote from W. Clement Stone, an extremely successful entrepreneur who encouraged a positive mental attitude to achieve success.

“Sales are contingent upon the attitude of the salesman – not the attitude of the prospect.” 

Remembering that it’s you who makes the difference may keep you going until you can sit down, take your shoes off and breathe a sigh of relief.

Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Selling!

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Holiday Sales

The scariest thing about Halloween is that it makes us realize how little time we have left in this year. Which means that if you haven’t already rolled out your holiday selling plans now is the time. For those who are not yet thinking about the holidays, here are a few tips.

While the main focus is on December don’t forget that Thanksgiving is coming up first. Information on which of your wines pair well with traditional or untraditional Thanksgiving feasts should already be on your website, in your emails, and in your hospitality center.

On to December. A significant percentage of shoppers have already started their holiday shopping by the end of October and the majority will have started shopping before the end of November, The good news is that the different articles I have been reading about who starts their holiday shopping when all say that many people start early, they do not say that they all finish early.

As wine is the perfect gift for almost any occasion, the sooner you let them know that you can take care of most of the holiday needs, the better. Many of your customers are already thinking about holiday gifts, holiday parties and what they will need.

Send an email now to your customers reminding them of what you can do for them to make buying for the upcoming holidays easier. Include some tips on holiday dinners or other get-togethers (there are lots of sites on the Internet that offer holiday planning ideas). At the same time, let them know that you can solve their gift giving and holiday planning dilemmas by telling them what you have to offer.

  • Add a page to your website that features different options for gifts, complete with gift boxes, etc.
  • Remind them of the timeline for shipping to get their gifts to their destinations on time.
  • Schedule a one-day event on a weekend in mid-November for gift shopping, with a holiday theme. While Black Friday and the rest of the Thanksgiving weekend are big draws, there are also many shoppers who prefer not to fight the crowds.
  • Offer a special holiday shopping day for wine club members.
  • Offer holiday gifts for businesses to give to clients.
  • As the holidays approach, shoot out short weekly emails with tips on fun and festive entertaining.
  • Have information in your hospitality center about your holiday offerings for guests to take with them.

There are many people who don’t like to shop or don’t know what to buy for others.  Make it simple for them to get most of their holiday shopping done in one place and… make that one place your place.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

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Creating Connected Customers

It’s interesting that businesses want customers to be more connected with them, though many businesses are afraid to give the customers what they want, which is connection with the people in the business.

Customer connection is a big part of the wine industry in general, and particularly true for customers who belong to wine clubs especially when the winery is a “small, family-owned winery.” Though even with wine clubs in corporate wineries, the members are still looking for connection.

There are many reasons why people may choose to join wine clubs… yes they like the wine, yes they enjoy the events, and yes they like to bring their friends and be able to taste for free. All these things are definite perks. Though there are two defining reasons: Connection and Access.

The majority, though not all, look for connection with the winery owners, the winemaker, and the staff. They like being recognized when they walk into the tasting room and the staff person knows their name. For those of you who are old enough, think about the TV show Cheers. Having those connections allows them to tell their friends:

“I was just at Bahoula Winery, talking to the winemaker, Susan, do you know her? Lovely person and she said…”

There is a great deal of pleasure to be had by being one up on your friends.

The other reason people like to be a “special” customer at a winery, like one who is in the wine club, is access. They have access to events, to the wine clubroom, if there is one and to other parts of the winery that regular customers may not see.

They also get access to more information about the wines and the option to buy older wines, newer wines before the general release and large format, limited release bottles.  There are a lot of perks to being part of the wine club if wineries understand what it is that their customers are looking for.

Although these perks should not only be for wine club members. They should also be for those people who, while they may not belong to your wine club, spend a lot of money with you or bring others to your winery who spend money.

Make sure that your best customers have access to you and feel connected. Drop them a personal email once in a while to ask them what they thought of a wine they just received from you. Or have pictures of your best customers on their customer record so you recognize them and call them by name. You never know you might make some new friends.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

Elizabeth Slater

Customer Engagement & Sales Training

707.953.1289, E@inshortmarketing.com

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Overcoming Objections to the Price of Your Products, Part Two

As I mentioned last week, I downloaded an informational guide with information on overcoming sales objections from Resourceful Selling. This week is part two in the review of the information.

First:  Let’s look at things that can go wrong.

Sometimes the salesperson, if uncomfortable with the price, can transmit that feeling to the customer, perhaps not in words but by how the information is presented. It’s a must that the salesperson is comfortable with the price. If not, they may need more training in sales in general and in your products in particular.

Many winery tasting room salespeople get into the business because they like wine, not because they like to sell. And, as many owners also don’t like to sell (they prefer to create), there is not the emphasis on sales that there should be. Make sales and customer engagement high on the list of the experience you are looking for when interviewing potential salespeople. Or if you are the salesperson, make sure you are applying for jobs for the right reasons and jobs that fit what you want to do with your life.

As a salesperson, are you ready to defend (in a non-combative or judgmental way) the prices that are being asked for the product you sell? Do they think the wine is worth the price?

Price, like any other objection to the sale, is a problem-solving process. If the customer is not ready to pay the price the winery is selling it for, why not?  Find out the reason and you can usually turn the customer around. Sell on the quality or the fact the customer can use this to impress their friends. You can also bring up the idea that if someone wants to pay a lesser price, s/he can always buy a case or half case and receive a special quantity price.

Remember that customers are looking for:

  • What is in it for them – How they benefit from the purchase.
  • It is benefits rather than features that make the sale (buying is done through the emotional part of the brain.)
  • What is the perceived value in relation to price.
  • Value is in the mind of the purchaser rather than the product.
  • If, as a salesperson, you believe that price may be an obstacle, bring it up before the customer does: “You can always find less expensive wine, but nothing at this quality for the price.”
  • Add value to every sale, even when the customer is not objecting. It will bring them back to see you again.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

Elizabeth Slater

Customer Engagement & Sales Training

707.953.1289, E@inshortmarketing.com

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Overcoming Objections to the Price of Your Products (Part One)

I downloaded a handy informational guide of overcoming sales objections from Resourceful Selling, which I am going to share you over the next couple of blogs.

The information starts with a headline:

“The price objection is the quickest way for a prospect to get rid of a salesperson.

But a price objection shouldn’t mark the end of a discussion.”

Good advice. I have seen too many salespeople give up when a potential customer says that the price is too expensive. But giving up should not be your first option.

First, find out what may be behind the customer telling you that the price is too high or that it is more than they usually pay.

  • You may not have asked enough questions about what the customer is looking for.
  • It may be that you haven’t communicated the value of your product in a way that makes sense to your customer.
  • The customer may not have been fully made aware of the differentiation of your products or service from that of your competitors.
  • The customer may be fishing to see if you are willing to go down on the price, but will buy it anyway if you don’t.

For any of these reasons, the price may become a serious factor in whether the customer buys or not. So your job is to identify the reason for buying your customer will be most susceptible to. In this article I was reading, they quoted a study by Alpha Marketing who ranked the reasons why customers choose to buy:

  1. Credibility
  2. Quality
  3. Company reputation
  4. Level of service
  5. Reliability of salesperson
  6. Responsiveness
  7. Ability to meet deadlines (which may not apply to you)
  8. Price

As you can see, the price is not the first thing on people’s minds. Yes, it is a factor but I believe with the right information, good customer service and a genuine interest in what is best for the customer, the price objection may be easily overcome.

Next week – ways to overcome price objections.

A tip of the glass from me to you!

Elizabeth Slater

Customer Engagement & Sales Training

707.953.1289, E@inshortmarketing.com

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